Budapest Post

Cum Deo pro Patria et Libertate
Budapest, Europe and world news

Thefts prompt recall of Kia, Hyundai cars in US

Thefts prompt recall of Kia, Hyundai cars in US

Attorneys general in 17 states on Thursday urged the federal government to recall millions of Kia and Hyundai cars because they are too easy to steal, a response to a sharp increase in thefts fueled by a viral social media challenge.
Some Kia and Hyundai cars sold in the United States over the last decade do not have engine immobilizers, a standard feature on most cars that prevents the engine from starting unless the key is present.

Videos circulating on social media have shown how people can start Kia and Hyundai models by using only a screwdriver and a USB cable. In Los Angeles, thefts of Hyundai and Kia cars increased by about 85 percent in 2022, now accounting for 20 percent of all car thefts in the city, according to the California attorney general’s office.

These social media-inspired thefts have often ended in tragedy, with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration blaming the stolen car trend for 14 reported crashes and eight deaths. In October, a police commissioner said that a car crash in Buffalo, New York, that left four teenagers dead may have been linked to the social media challenge. In the incident, a total of six teenagers were in a speeding Kia that crashed, Buffalo police said. The car had been reported stolen.

“The bottom line is, Kia’s and Hyundai’s failure to install standard safety features on many of their vehicles have put vehicle owners and the public at risk,” California Attorney General Rob Bonta said in a news release. “Instead of taking responsibility with appropriate corrective action, these carmakers have chosen instead to pass this risk onto consumers and our communities.”

Bonta and the other attorneys general sent a letter on Thursday to NHTSA requesting a nationwide recall. The letter also was signed by attorneys general from Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington and the District of Columbia.

Kia said in a statement that it is focused on the issue, “and we continue to take action to address the concerns these attorneys general have raised.” The automaker says more than 165,000 customers have had the software installed, and over 2 million owners have been contacted about it. The company says the vehicles comply with federal safety standards, so a recall isn’t necessary.

Hyundai also said its vehicles comply with federal anti-theft requirements. The company says it rolled out the software upgrade to prevent the thefts two months ahead of schedule, but it did not answer a question about how many vehicles have received it. “We are communicating with NHTSA on our many actions to assist our customers,” the company statement said.

The letter adds to the growing pressure on the South Korea-based automakers. Multiple cities, including St. Louis, Cleveland, Milwaukee, San Diego, Seattle and Columbus, Ohio, have already sued the automakers.

In September, the Highway Loss Data Institute, a unit of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, found that Hyundai and Kia cars without immobilizers had a vehicle theft claim rate of 2.18 per 1,000 insured vehicle years. The rest of the industry combined had a rate of 1.21.

Hyundai and Kia announced in February that they would provide software updates for vehicles that require the key to be in the ignition switch to turn the car on. The change also updates the cars’ theft alarm software to extend the length of an alarm from 30 seconds to 1 minute. About 3.8 million Hyundai cars and 4.5 million Kia cars are eligible for the software update.

But the service campaign by the affiliated Korean automakers is not a recall, which comes with reporting requirements and is monitored closely by NHTSA.

The agency said the Hyundai and Kia thefts involve criminal conduct that falls under the jurisdiction of law enforcement. Even so, NHTSA said it has met with the automakers to discuss theft vulnerability as well as software and hardware in the affected models.

The agency said it is getting regular updates on the companies’ plans. “NHTSA will continue to monitor this issue, spread awareness of further updates to local authorities and lend its expertise in efforts to strengthen motor vehicle safety,” the agency said.

But Michael Brooks, executive director of the nonprofit Center for Auto Safety, said there is no way for the public to track the effectiveness of a company’s internal service campaign. In a recall, NHTSA requires quarterly reports and monitors whether the recall repairs solve the problem, he said. The agency also requires automakers to notify each owner by mail.

“We won’t know how many are on the road with the problem” with a company service campaign, Brooks said. “We’re not going to know if the recall is effective, if notification went out properly.”

Brooks said NHTSA has been slow to react to auto thefts, even though the stolen Hyundais and Kias are causing safety problems on the roads.

Hyundai has said all models produced after Nov. 1, 2021, have immobilizers as standard equipment.

This story was first published on April 20, 2023. It was updated on April 21, 2023 to make clear that videos showing how people can start Kia and Hyundai models by using only a screwdriver and a USB cable were circulating on multiple social media services, not just TikTok.
Comments

Brad 1 year ago
This is government propaganda to create the problem claim it's because of videos online caused the theft of these cars.
The government is trying to take away freedoms as they did with Patriot Act.
The US government along with banks are committing banking crimes daily. Wells Fargo opened fake accounts claimed the account holders didn't pay their mortgage or car payments.
These are the real criminals

Newsletter

Related Articles

0:00
0:00
Close
Slovakian Prime Minister Robert Fico is in life-threatening condition after being shot multiple times
Xi Jinping Highlights Europe's Divisions Ahead of Putin Visit
German Court Rules AfD Can Be Monitored for Extremism
Xi Jinping Highlights Europe's Divisions Ahead of Putin Visit
UN General Assembly Approves Palestinian Membership Bid
Teens Forming Friendships with AI Chatbots
WhatsApp Rolls Out Major Redesign
Neuralink's First Brain Implant Experiences Issue
Apple Unveils New iPad Pro with M4 Chip, Misleading AI Claims
OpenAI to Announce Google Search Competitor
Apple Apologizes for Controversial iPad Pro Ad Featuring Instrument Destruction
Boeing 737 Catches Fire in Senegal, 10 Injured
Cruise Ship Arrives in NYC with Dead 44-Foot Whale on Bow
Trump lawyer questions Stormy Daniels' account of sex with Trump
Hunter Biden's Gun Charges Upheld, Trial Set for June
Last Indian soldiers leave Maldives
Espionage Scandal in Poland: Listening Devices Found Before Government Meeting
Apple Faces Significant Sales Decline Amid AI Integration Delay
Netanyahu's Firm Stance Amid Rafah Hostage Talks
New UK Laws: Banning Weak Passwords for Internet-Connected Devices to Enhance Cybersecurity
Spanish Prime Minister May Announce Resignation
New Study: Vaping May Lower Fertility in Women Trying to Get Pregnant
U.S. DOJ Seeks Three-Year Sentence for Binance Founder Changpeng Zhao
Orban: Destroy Liberal World Order - Predicts End This Year
Diplomatic Tensions: Sunak Clashes with Macron Over Rwanda Plan
A Jewish woman was kidnapped and raped in Gennevilliers (a suburb in western Paris), France, on the background of hatred for Israel
Russia: Deputy Defense Minister Arrested on Suspicion of Taking Bribes
Stanford Researchers Discover Child Abuse Material in AI Image Generator Dataset: Can Regulations Prevent Explicit Deepfakes of Children?
Record-Breaking 'Extreme Heat Stress' Days in Europe's Contrasting 2023 Summer: A Health Threat
Thousands Evacuated: 1,000-Kg NATO Bomb Removed from Serbian City
European Car Sales Drop 5.2% in March: Electric Vehicles Face Challenges Amidst Market Downturn and High Prices
Urgent Call from William Burns as Kyiv Braces for Russian Summer Offensive.
IMF Boosts Russia's 2024 Economic Growth Forecast to 3.2%
BOEING WHISTLEBLOWER: THE MAX AIRPLANE IS NOT SAFE!!!
Creative menu of a Pizza restaurant..
The communists couldn’t ban us and neither could the Brussels bureaucrats. The second day of the NatCon Talk conference is underway.
You can be a very successful player, but a player with character is another level!
Resumption of Controversial NatCon 2024 Conference in Brussels
The 60 Minutes journalists went to Sweden to show us the wonderful world of diversity and integration but they were threatened, beaten and chased away by diversity itself.
Experience the Future of Dining: My Visit to an AI-Powered Burger Joint
China's Economy Surges Ahead with 5.3% GDP Growth in Q1 2024, Boosted by High-Tech Manufacturing
Brussels Venue Cancels Right-Wing Conference: Free Speech Crisis as Concert Noble Drops NatCon Event
The West stands with Israel, Iran is furious: "Double standards and irresponsibility"
Here is a robot that can clean the river in Siem Reap.
Play stupid games, win stupid prizes
Hungarian PM Viktor Orbán: "We condemn last night's attack against Israel, and pray for the safety of the Israeli people."
Stabbing rampage terror attack in Sydney, at least four people killed, early reports that a baby was among those stabbed.
Iran fired more than 300 drones and missiles at Israel overnight. Israel Reports Light Damage After Iran Launches Large Strike.
I will never get enough of his videos and the pure joy and beauty of these women!!
Scientists at the University of Maryland have developed an "invisibility cloak", for AI using adversarial patterns on a sweater, making the wearer nearly undetectable to standard object detection methods.
×